China


We see a lot of potential, and it is more than clear that today’s Africa is what China was 30 years ago: the place to be for fast economic growth and help-to-self-help. Which, in the end of the day, is what really matters – to me.

A few examples of what we have seen ourselves in Kenya:
• IBM recently opened their office in Nairobi, their first R&D department in the developing world, 9th in total
• MIT-students start their companies in Kenya’s Nairobi because of the buzzing creativity and potential on Ngong Road.
• Google’s grand office opening-party in Nairobi took place when we were there.
• We’ve met traditional Maasai men that lived far, far out in the bushes without electricity; yet greeted us “Hey, give me your mobile and I’ll send you some nice tribe-songs via Bluetooth”, and did it.

..and in Rwanda:
• Rwanda’s backbone of optical fibre for broadband is better than many others’, e.g. France’s.
• Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, is just as clean as Singapore, and their roads are equal in standard.
• Carnegie Mellon University has a campus in Rwanda, their first in the developing world. “Things are too slow in US and Europe”, their director told us.

Our findings, so-far: Africa is on the move

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Our first day started with a good breakfast in company with the hotels other guests. Then most of the day went past as a combination of sunbathing and reading the opponent’s report; seminar tomorrow. At lunch we got company with a manager from an NGO who provides long-term aid in several Sub-Saharan countries. Exciting to hear how they work with the dependency issues that are unavoidable; as for instance SIDA experiences largely in Tanzania right now.

But the most important update for you is probably that I’ve replaced my Swedish SIM-card to a Kenyan one, thus we are reached via +254 (0) 739 679 549 onwards. Consequently, I cannot answer any calls to my regular number.

Picture from Shanghai last December.

Call me maybe

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The last two days in Linköping have meant temperatures below zero, icy winds and even snowfall. So getting into that plane this morning was not a hard choice! After all, last year made me used to far warmer climates.

KLM flies from Linköping to Nairobi via Schiphol, with the latter route served by 747s. First time I fly in a Jumbo-jet, which despite its size, reputation and individual entertainment-systems has a hard time competing with the much more recent A380-800 that brought me from Seoul to Dubai.

This sunrise was captured in China, but today we saw kind of the same. After which Wille spotted Öresundsbron from an unusual perspective, while we cruised south along Denmark’s east coast.

Departure!

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KHU main gate at full moon
So, the time has come. After waiving off all the exchange students, one at the time, am I now waiving bye to Korea myself.

This has been a truly amazing year and I am filled with gratefulness to all of you who have shared those experiences with me. The biggest and most important gift of being here is obviously the wealth of perspectives, and the friendships themselves, by spending time with amazing people from allover the world.

A deep, humble and happy thank you to my new friends from
Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Ghana, Guatemala, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Iraq, Japan, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mongolia, Netherlands, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Rwanda, Sweden, Tunisia, UK, USA, Vietnam…and of course everyone from Korea.

You will always have a place in my heart.

Goodbye

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