Tanzania


The last Kenya-weekend was just as exciting as the first ones, but much more touching.

Our new friend Simon, an indigenous Maasai warrior of Christian beliefs, has done more than most for Kenya’s and Tanzania’s rural population: building numerous churches, schools and drilling water wells, beside spreading wisdom in his role as bishop.

The funding comes from American churches, via Derrick who actually also linked me to Simon. I find it fascinating to hear Simon explain how it makes sense that they train their warriors to never fear or doubt. A parallel society with very different values than ours, which include much tighter bonds within families than average western citizens have.

Wille and I got to stay the weekend in his house in a remote Maasai village. We got to meet and talk to so many nice persons from his tribe and were shown a school he built, visited one of the water wells, shared a meal with a Chief at a big political meeting, spoke to his friend John who works at the president’s office, and waived to the gazelles and giraffes that walked past us. An unforgettable memory; thank you for showing us all everything Simon!

Picture showing John, Simon, me and the driver Joshua at the rand of the Rift Valley close to Ngong and with their village and the volcano Suswa in the background.

Simon the Bishop

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The wildebeest migration is one of the highlights in Maasai Mara/Serengeti’s calendar. That is when 1.5 million wildebeests (also called gnus) move north or south just like birds do. We thought we’d come a month too late and that all of them had already gotten far into Tanzania, luckily were there thousands and thousands of idlers.


We saw them march across the savannah; until they devastated reached rivers they had to cross. The brown waters were filled with crocodiles and all-over trees around sat vultures waiting patiently. Apparently, the wildebeests behave like lemmings, and 10% of them die at each passage. Thus it was not hard to imagine why they hesitated to be the first one getting into the water as the number of colleagues behind them grew. Tough life.

Wildebeest migration

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Maasai Mara is cut of by the Tanzanian-Kenyan border, where the national park Serengeti continues. Because of this, we reached the country border when we drove around in the park. Not that I consider a few minutes across the border without legal permits as visiting the country, but it still felt quite nice.

Tanzania

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As mentioned in the post “Progress”, our Thursday was all about planning and arranging meetings. But no matter how exciting the project is, are business meetings on weekends not an option. So today’s biggest issue was ‘What to do during the weekend?’

Thus, our driver for the weekend will pick us up on early Saturday morning, and we’re off for Safari in Maasai Mara; the national park that is called Serengeti on the other side of the Tanzanian border. Looking forward!

Off for Safari

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Our first day started with a good breakfast in company with the hotels other guests. Then most of the day went past as a combination of sunbathing and reading the opponent’s report; seminar tomorrow. At lunch we got company with a manager from an NGO who provides long-term aid in several Sub-Saharan countries. Exciting to hear how they work with the dependency issues that are unavoidable; as for instance SIDA experiences largely in Tanzania right now.

But the most important update for you is probably that I’ve replaced my Swedish SIM-card to a Kenyan one, thus we are reached via +254 (0) 739 679 549 onwards. Consequently, I cannot answer any calls to my regular number.

Picture from Shanghai last December.

Call me maybe

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